Education jobs outweigh applicants

New research reveals education jobs outweigh applicants, and competition is low as we move into the new school year

The education sector has one of the highest number of jobs available, however the level of applicant interest has dropped slightly over the last quarter, a recent study has shown. 

In Q2 of this year (April, May, June) the education sector saw the third highest number of job advertisements, out of the 32 job sectors examined in the study by CV-Library. With over 28,000 jobs posted over the period, education vacancies represented 9% of total job advertisements. 

There has been a 37% year-on-year growth in job advertisements, and a 21% rise in job applications between Q2 2013 and Q2 2014. However, between Q1 and Q2 of this year statistics have revealed a 5% decrease in applications – in keeping with a trend which has affected a number of job sectors over the last quarter.

It appears that the number of job opportunities within education is increasing at a greater speed than the number of job applications – demand from institutions looking to hire currently outweighs interest from potential candidates.

Data has also shown that whilst job applications across the board have gone down by 11% since the last quarter, job searches have increased by 43% in the last year. It seems that whilst interest in exploring employment opportunities remains high, the desire to commit to applying for jobs is not as strong as it was in the previous quarter. 

With only six applications per job advertisement within the education sector, the competition for vacancies is low. To put this into perspective, the most competitive job sector in the previous quarter was administration, with an applications per advertisement ratio of 65:1. In Q2 of last year, the number of applications per job in education was 9:1, revealing a drop in competition for professionals looking for work within this sector.

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