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‘Rubbish’ house built in Brighton

Britain’s housing industry could learn from University of Brighton research and use recycled ‘rubbish’ in construction projects

More than 20,000 old toothbrushes, two tonnes of denim jeans, 4,000 video cassettes, 2,000 used carpet tiles, thrown away timber, paper, plastic bags and chalk, were used in the house construction at the university’s Grand Parade campus in Brighton.

Visited recently by Brighton Green MP Caroline Lucas, she commented: “The housing industry has a huge amount to catch up on. For every five houses currently being built enough waste is created to build one extra house – most people understand that this makes absolutely no sense at all.

“The university’s research associated with this Waste House is incredibly important because it demonstrates empirically how waste can be reused and recycled. It demonstrates that there is no such thing as rubbish, just things in the wrong place.

“It demonstrates that one can build in an economic way that is absolutely in tune with the environment. Anyone who thinks there is some kind of contradiction between putting the environment first or putting the economy first is mistaken.

Ms Lucas was shown round the award winning House by Duncan Baker-Brown, university lecturer and the House architect. He worked with the Mears Group which, with undergraduate students, students from City College Brighton & Hove, the reuse organisation FREEGLE UK, private companies and volunteers, built the house in the grounds of the university’s Grand Parade campus. Brighton

Mr Baker-Brown said: “The House is a live research project and permanent design workshop to be used by our students and as a centre for visiting school children to learn about sustainability.”

 

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