Nobel prize winner opens Warwick new build

Nobel Prize winner Dr Randy Schekman has given the keynote speech at the opening of the latest addition to Warwick Medical School

Dr Schekman, who was honoured for his pioneering work in the fields of cell physiology and genetics flew in from the States to mark the official opening of the Mechanochemical Cell Biology Building (MCBB) extension.

The MCBB extension houses an extensive tissue culture and microscope facility and will pave the way for the discovery and design of new diagnostics and treatments for human disease. It will enable researchers to uncover the cytoskeletal and molecular motor-based mechanisms driving cell division, migration, organisation and macromolecular transport using novel imaging, computational and biophysical approaches. Warwick Medical School is part of the University of Warwick and the MCBB is on the Medical School’s campus at Gibbet Hill.

Prof. Jonathan Millar, Head of Division of Biomedical Cell Biology said: “This world-class science building exemplifies the University’s and Warwick Medical School’s commitment to world-class inter-disciplinary research, training and innovation.” 

This world-class science building exemplifies the University’s and Warwick Medical School’s commitment to world-class inter-disciplinary research, training and innovation

Dr Randy Schekman is a University Professor in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, and an Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. In 2013 he shared for the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with two other scientists, James Rothman and Thomas Südhof, for their discovery of the machinery that regulates vesicle trafficking, a major transport system in all cells. Dr Schekman’s discoveries have had a direct impact on the medical and biotechnology fields, for example through the molecular engineering of yeast to release therapeutically useful agents, such as insulin and human growth hormone. 

Following the official opening on 11 August by the Vice Chancellor Professor Stuart Croft, Dr Schekman delivered his key note speech in which he discussed the scientific and personal influences that led him to the many key discoveries of his 40-year career.

Dr Schekman said: “It’s been a pleasure to be invited to help commemorate the opening of the new extension and to meet a host of outstanding cell biologists and biophysicists at Warwick Medical School. It is extremely encouraging to see the University invest in this vital field of research.” 

W: www2.warwick.ac.uk

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