URL: string(16) "method-recycling"

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ehubpostmeta.meta_key = 'webinar_group_webinar' AND ( ( mt1.post_id IS NULL OR ( mt2.meta_key = 'webinar_group_webinar' AND mt2.meta_value = '0' ) ) AND ( mt3.post_id IS NULL OR ( mt4.meta_key = 'protected' AND mt4.meta_value = '0' ) ) ) ) AND ehubposts.post_type = 'post' AND ((ehubposts.post_status = 'publish')) GROUP BY ehubposts.ID ORDER BY ehubposts.menu_order, ehubposts.post_date DESC [posts] => Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28198 [post_author] => 23 [post_date] => 2020-01-31 15:36:04 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-01-31 15:36:04 [post_content] => One of the greatest issues facing the wider recycling industry today is confusion – no one really knows what is going on. Here in the UK we have some pretty hefty recycling goals, and to achieve them there needs to be consistency and standardisation in the industry from the beginning to end. Organisations don’t have the power to change the whole system, but they can change what happens in their facilities, while the good people at WRAP work on unifying the wider system. Method Recycling redesigned the way modern spaces recycle so that doing your part to recycle more and waste less becomes simple but effective. What's the problem? Let's be honest here, recycling takes a certain amount of motivation at the personal level. Whether that’s taking the time to educate ourselves, seeking to find the right bin or even simply leaving the comfort of a desk to recycle. Desk bins, standalone general waste bins or bins hidden in cupboards compound these issues, making it easier for users to place all of their waste into one bin unnoticed. This is further complicated when an individual is in a different area, meaning the need to spend time hunting for the right recycling bin, often placing it in the nearest receptacle. While we’re spending more on the aesthetics of our spaces if we want to reduce the impact of our day-today behaviours on the environment the design and layout of our bins is important. As pictured, one of Method’s clients had an array of bins and signage that were located sporadically throughout their building. There’s no intention to shame any organisation implementing recycling bins in their space; but to have a real impact on recycling rates, recycling should be convenient, consistent in design and location and intuitive. That’s where Method comes in.  Recycle more with Open Plan Recycling Method’s 60L recycling and waste bins are designed to be placed together to form flexible recycling stations that are then located consistently throughout a space or facility. They’re colour coded to complement modern spaces while matching industry standards. Bringing the colour-coded stations out into the open-plan design of modern spaces makes the bins stand out, easy to find and the same in all spaces. Meaning that when individuals move from one floor, building or department to the other, the bins are all the same. This becomes even more applicable when there are multiple buildings for the same company, locally or globally. Most importantly, regular interaction with consistent bins means that recycling will become an unconscious behaviour, while making recycling more convenient than general waste options. Further, by bringing recycling and waste out into the open you increase accountability. When individuals are in the view of others, they’re more likely to consider where their waste should go, even subconsciously. The Power of Visibility Visibility is one of the key factors that has led to the success of the Method system. Having the beautiful bins proudly out in the open increases awareness and develops a culture of shared responsibility. The bins become a visible statement of an organisation's commitment to recycling and sustainability; generating conversations and changing recycling habits at work and subsequently at home. Are you ready to make a visible difference with an effective recycling system? Method - methodrecycling.com [post_title] => Recycle more and waste less with a new Method [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => recycle-more-and-waste-less-with-a-new-method [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-04-07 15:12:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-04-07 14:12:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://universitybusiness.co.uk/dashboard2/?post_type=articles&p=28198 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 25068 [post_author] => 23 [post_date] => 2019-09-30 10:42:24 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-09-30 09:42:24 [post_content] => Around the world, the focus on sustainable practices continues to grow and there is pressure from all sides to change our behaviours. The younger generations, in particular, want to use their time and resources to make an impact. For universities, this is bringing around a new kind of student who are increasingly socially and environmentally aware – and willing to do the hard work to make a difference. This means there is rising pressure for you as an organisation to be a leader in both thought and action.
Recycling is one of the easiest ways to reduce your environmental footprint
Often recycling is perceived to be confusing, time-consuming and, ultimately, put into the 'too hard' basket. But we have been trying to create recycling habits with ineffective tools – recycling bins are ugly and hidden in corners, while waste bins are frequently placed around a space. Particularly on a campus where individuals move around frequently, for recycling to be a habit bins need to stand out, be clear and consistent. Recycling is one of the easiest ways to reduce your environmental footprint, but how do you make it successful on a campus full of thousands of students? Method has the answer. Method began with the desire to make a difference: the co-founders Steven and India wanted to design a recycling bin that effectively changes recycling behaviours in modern spaces. The award-winning bins can be now found helping universities across Australia and New Zealand to recycle more and waste less, including Melbourne University, Auckland University, and Victoria University, as well as leading organisations around the world such as Foster + Partners, the Sydney Cricket Ground and The Office Group. Are you ready to make a difference on your campus and be a leader in the UK? Make bins work for you Let’s be honest here: recycling takes a certain amount of motivation at the personal level. Whether that’s taking the time to educate ourselves, seeking to find the right bin or even simply taking a few extra steps to recycle. But Method believes in the power of standardisation, consistency and visibility to make recycling convenient and a habit for individuals. Method’s 60L recycling and waste bins are colour coded to complement modern spaces while matching industry standards. The bins are designed to be placed together to form flexible recycling stations that are then located consistently throughout a space or campus. Bringing the colour-coded stations out into the open-plan design of modern spaces makes the bins stand out, easy to find and the same in all areas. So when individuals move from one building or space to another, the bins are all the same. This is particularly important for universities where often most buildings have a unique design and layout.
Bringing the colour-coded stations out into the open-plan design of modern spaces makes the bins stand out
Most importantly, regular interaction with consistent bins means that recycling will become an unconscious behaviour; while making recycling more convenient than general waste options. Further, by bringing recycling and waste out into the open, you increase accountability. When individuals are in the view of others, they’re more likely to consider where their waste should go, even subconsciously. Method at the Sydney Cricket Ground The Sydney Cricket Ground introduced Method bins when they were looking to implement an effective sorting system for their 1.5 million visitors each year. Method are facilitating the Sydney Cricket Ground Trust with their waste management objectives, helping them separate food organics from mixed recyclables, and to recycle more efficiently. William Konya, the SCG’s presentation services manager, states: “It is important to demonstrate a positive approach to reducing environmental impact. The visual element of Method’s bins has been effective in garnering support for the recovery process.” Are you ready to make a difference on your campus? 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Here in the UK we have some pretty hefty recycling goals, and to achieve them there needs to be consistency and standardisation in the industry from the beginning to end. Organisations don’t have the power to change the whole system, but they can change what happens in their facilities, while the good people at WRAP work on unifying the wider system. Method Recycling redesigned the way modern spaces recycle so that doing your part to recycle more and waste less becomes simple but effective. What's the problem? Let's be honest here, recycling takes a certain amount of motivation at the personal level. Whether that’s taking the time to educate ourselves, seeking to find the right bin or even simply leaving the comfort of a desk to recycle. Desk bins, standalone general waste bins or bins hidden in cupboards compound these issues, making it easier for users to place all of their waste into one bin unnoticed. This is further complicated when an individual is in a different area, meaning the need to spend time hunting for the right recycling bin, often placing it in the nearest receptacle. While we’re spending more on the aesthetics of our spaces if we want to reduce the impact of our day-today behaviours on the environment the design and layout of our bins is important. As pictured, one of Method’s clients had an array of bins and signage that were located sporadically throughout their building. There’s no intention to shame any organisation implementing recycling bins in their space; but to have a real impact on recycling rates, recycling should be convenient, consistent in design and location and intuitive. That’s where Method comes in.  Recycle more with Open Plan Recycling Method’s 60L recycling and waste bins are designed to be placed together to form flexible recycling stations that are then located consistently throughout a space or facility. They’re colour coded to complement modern spaces while matching industry standards. Bringing the colour-coded stations out into the open-plan design of modern spaces makes the bins stand out, easy to find and the same in all spaces. Meaning that when individuals move from one floor, building or department to the other, the bins are all the same. This becomes even more applicable when there are multiple buildings for the same company, locally or globally. Most importantly, regular interaction with consistent bins means that recycling will become an unconscious behaviour, while making recycling more convenient than general waste options. Further, by bringing recycling and waste out into the open you increase accountability. When individuals are in the view of others, they’re more likely to consider where their waste should go, even subconsciously. The Power of Visibility Visibility is one of the key factors that has led to the success of the Method system. Having the beautiful bins proudly out in the open increases awareness and develops a culture of shared responsibility. The bins become a visible statement of an organisation's commitment to recycling and sustainability; generating conversations and changing recycling habits at work and subsequently at home. Are you ready to make a visible difference with an effective recycling system? 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Method Recycling

recycling bins
sustainability
waste management
About

We enable any space to waste less, and recycle more - beautifully.

Method Recycling are the makers of beautiful recycling and waste bins that help users to accurately separate their waste. Method Recycling’s award-winning bins are placed together to form flexible recycling stations that are then located indoors throughout a campus. The bins are designed to be out in the open where they increase awareness, accountability and become a visible statement of an organisations commitment to recycling and sustainability.

The bins have been proven to change recycling and waste behaviours in open-plan spaces worldwide, including the University of Melbourne, Auckland University, Foster + Partners, and The Office Groups beautiful co-working spaces in London.

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Method Recycling on Business Reporter

Method Recycling was invited to speak to the Telegraph Business Reporter about how the designer bins are helping organisations around the world to recycle more and waste less, while improving their bottom line.

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Bins made from recycled materials

At its core, Method Recycling believes in facilitating the circular economy, capturing recyclable materials and diverting them from landfill and now their bins are made from recycled materials.

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Successful Recycling Guide

Method Recycling have helped organisations around the world to recycle more and waste less. Benefit from their experience and check out their successful recycling guide.

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Method Recycling News

Recycle more and waste less with a new Method

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Be a leader in thought and action

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