QMU and Alzheimer Scotland launch health scholarship

New university scholarships launched for allied health professionals in Scotland

Alzheimer Scotland has teamed up with Queen Margaret University (QMU), Edinburgh, to launch a new scholarship initiative for allied health professionals in Scotland

The Alzheimer Scotland Scholarships will provide part funding for students to undertake a stand-alone MSc module focussed on ‘Developing Rights-Based Practice for Allied Health Professionals working with People Living with Dementia, their Families & Carers,’ at QMU.

In Scotland alone about 90,000 people have dementia, excluding the wider number of people who are affected by a family member or friend with the condition. This growing problem presents massive challenges for health and social care services, as well as the economy. 

The Alzheimer Scotland Scholarships have been designed to help address some of these problems and are open to all allied health professionals living in Scotland who are either already studying an MSc in a related subject area or working in practice.  Students who complete the module will also benefit from continuous professional development credits.

By working with Alzheimer Scotland we can equip our students to better understand people’s needs and to work much more effectively in the changing landscape of health and social care in Scotland.” 

The Alzheimer Scotland Scholarships will be managed by Queen Margaret University’s School of Health Sciences. Ian McMillan, Head of Division, Occupational Therapy and Arts Therapies at Queen Margaret University, said: “By working with Alzheimer Scotland we can equip our students to better understand people’s needs and to work much more effectively in the changing landscape of health and social care in Scotland.” 

Health academics at QMU are continuing to develop a strategic alliance with Alzheimer Scotland in a bid to improve student understanding of dementia. The move will ensure that healthcare students on this module at QMU have a robust education in dementia and become more effective as healthcare professionals in the workplace. The ultimate aim is to improve the care and wellbeing of individuals with dementia and families affected by the condition across all service provision – within the NHS, private practice, social work and the voluntary sector  

Henry Simmons from Alzheimer Scotland, said: “There are few families in Scotland who are not affected by dementia; this condition is one of Scotland’s most pressing public health issues. Alzheimer Scotland is delighted to provide support to students undertaking the MSc in ‘Developing Rights-Based Practice for Allied Health Professionals working with People Living with Dementia, their Families & Carers’ as part of our partnership with Queen Margaret University. 

“The rights-based approach of this MSc is exactly the type of engagement we want to have with practitioners, to help us move away from a medically-focused model and towards an citizen-based model of dementia care and support.”

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