Nottingham University launches Institute of Policy and Engagement

The knowledge transfer initiative will bring all of Nottingham's policy analysis and development under one roof

The University of Nottingham has launched a policy body in a bid to improve knowledge transfer partnerships.

The university follows in the footsteps of the universities of Glasgow, Manchester and Bath in establishing a dedicated organisation for policy analysis and development.

The new Institute of Policy and Engagement was officially opened by Nottingham University president and vice-chancellor Prof Shearer West.

Stephen Meek, director for the newly founded institute, said the university hoped to “translate our discoveries into world-changing solutions”.

These are complex times and to navigate shifting landscapes the value of evidence, shared knowledge and trusted partnerships has never been greater
– Stephen Meek, Institute of Policy and Engagement

“The institute’s aim is to support the exchange of knowledge and ideas to enrich policymaking, inspire people, support communities, transform lives and shape the future. These are complex times and to navigate shifting landscapes the value of evidence, shared knowledge and trusted partnerships has never been greater,” Mr Meek said.


Read more: Nottingham Trent announces partnership with local college


At the launch, Nottingham introduced experts who have impacted government policy and will be partners in the institute’s work.

Prof West was joined at the opening event by Prof Paul Mizen, who helps the Bank of England assess the impact of Brexit, and Prof Paul Wilson, who worked with the government to write replacement UK legislation for the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy.

Also at the event were Nottingham’s Prof Rachel Fyson and Dr Rachael Clawson who currently work with the Home Office on projects to help protect people with learning difficulties from forced marriages.


Read more: Knowledge exchange: £10m project pushes student involvement


 

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