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Eight ways to use a classroom camera or visualiser

With cameras becoming a standard piece of equipment in the classroom, HUE HD tells of their eight uses

Posted by Rianna Newman | July 20, 2017 | Technology

It really is true that a single picture can replace 1,000 words. Our brains process images 60,000 times faster than text so using images (either static or video) to teach any subject has to be a good thing. Here are eight practical and compelling ways to use a classroom camera or visualiser:

  • Microscope. Stimulate curiosity by showing objects or insects close-up.
  • ‘What a good one looks like’ (WAGOLL). Share a student’s work and then peer edit with the rest of the class.
  • CPD or continual professional development. Harvard’s Centre for Educational Policy Research (CEPR) reported that teachers found feedback more constructive and helpful using recordings of their class rather than being observed in the classroom.
  • Presentations. Working with a visualiser is the perfect introduction to making presentations and develops key communication skills.
  • Live video. Recording live video experiments and video conferencing with other schools.
  • Time-lapse photography. Record an egg hatching or weather changing. Set the camera to automatically capture images out of normal school hours.
  • Doc-casting and flipped learning. Doc-casting (a bit like podcasting) is combining the creation of instructional videos using your document camera with the ability to share the content in any way you choose. Provide your video prior to the lesson and precious in-class time can be reserved for discussion, exercises or one-on-one time.
  • Stop motion animation and 21st-century skills. Stop motion animation is a movie-making technique where one image (frame) is captured at a time. The object is moved very slightly before capturing the next image, a process which is repeated many times. When the images are replayed it creates the illusion of movement. Because students construct, explain and create videos, they become authors of their own knowledge, rather than passive recipients of lessons.

For further information visit: http://huehd.com

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